Mobile First Cloud First

A blog by Geert van der Cruijsen on Apps, Cloud & ALM

Tag: Azure

Created an open source VSTS build & release task for Azure Web App Virtual File System

I’ve created a new VSTS Build & Release task to help you interact with the (VFS) Virtual File System API (Part of KUDU API of your Azure Web App). Currently this task can only be used to delete specific files or directories from the web app during your build or release workflow. It will be updated in the near future to also be able to list files or to upload / download files through the VFS API.

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The reason i made this task was that i needed it at my current customer. We’re deploying our custom solution to a Sitecore website running on Azure web apps using MSDeploy. The deployment consists of 2 parts: an install of the out-of-the-box Sitecore installation and the deployment of our customisations. When deploying new versions we want to keep the Sitecore installation and MSDeploy will update most of our customisations. Some customisations however create artifacts that stay on the server and aren’t  in control of the MSDeploy package that can cause errors on our web application. This new VSTS Build / Release task can help you delete these files. In the future this task will be updated with other functionality of the VFS API such as listing, uploading or downloading files.

The task is available in the VSTS Marketplace and is open source on github.

Let’s have a look how to use this task and how it works under the hood.
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Building, testing and deploying precompiled Azure Functions

Azure functions are great to build small specialized services really fast. When you create an Azure Functions project by using the built-in template from the SDK in Visual Studio you’ll automatically get a function made in a CSX file. This looks like plain old C# but in fact it is actually  is C# Script. When you’re deploying these files to Azure you don’t have to compile them locally or on a build server but you can just upload them to your Azure Storage directly.

In the last update for Azure Functions the option to build precompiled functions was added. Doing this is actually pretty simple. I’ve created a sample project on Github containing a precompiled Azure function, unit tests for the function and an ARM template to deploy the function. Lets go over the steps to create a precompiled Azure function.

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Adding an Azure web app to an Application Service Environment running in another subscription

Web apps and Api apps  in Azure are great, however when using them you have to agree to have them connected to the internet directly without the possibility of adding a WAF or other kind of additional protection (next to the default Azure line of defense). When you want to add something like that you have to add an Internal Application Service Environment to host your apps so you can control the network access to these apps.

App Service

However adding an Application Service Environment is quite costly if you are only running a few apps in them. (Minimum requirements for an Application Service Environment are 2 P2’s and 2 P1’s to run the Application Service Environment (ASE)

In our case adding an ASE was fine except that we have a scenario where we have quite a lot of subscriptions and most of them are quite small running only a couple of apps in them. Adding an ASE for each subscription was going to become a bit to costly so we came up with the idea of creating 1 central subscription called “Shared Services” where we would host things that multiple departments could share such as WAF functionality, the VNet, the Express route and also the ASE.

After creating the design we ran in to some problems actually implementing it because we weren’t able to select an ASE in another subscription which was part of the same enterprise agreement when creating an App Service Plan or Web App in Azure.  After checking it seems that this is a limitation of the Azure Portal and we had to use ARM templates to create our web app. This didn’t matter because we were planning on using ARM templates anyway. so we started to give it a try.

At first we had some trouble adding the ASE as our hosting environment. we tried adding the “HostingEnvironment” to point to the name of the ASE in our other subscription but this did not work and we kept receiving errors like “Cannot find HostingEnvironment with name *HostingEnvironmentName*. (Code: NotFound)”

ASE erorr message

 

After that we tried to remove the “HostingEnvironment” property and only set the “HostingEnvironmentID” to directly link to the full resourceID of our ASE. this did get our hopes up because we were able to deploy the web app, however it was running on the P1’s that were part of the workerpool of our internal ASE but it still had a public dns name and was accessible from the internet. I guess we weren’t supposed to created it this way. so i asked help from the Microsoft product team and they pointed me to the right correction.

It all boils down to using a newer API version of the Web App and App Service Plan ARM template API than that are generated in visual studio when building ARM templates. we had to use apiVersion: 2015-08-01

in here we can set the “hostingEnvironmentProfile” to the full resourceID of our ASE for both the App Service Plan as the Web App. Next to that we also have to set the sku to the correct worker pool within our ASE.

Now when we try to deploy our ARM template it will actually create an App Service Plan and Web App in another subscription than where our ASE is running. Nice!

Hopefully this post will help you when you run in to the same problems i did when trying to deploy web apps in an ASE using ARM templates.

Happy Coding / Deploying

Geert van der Cruijsen

Upgraded my blog to Project Nami on Azure

My blog has been running on WordPress in combination with Microsoft Azure since the start. I always disliked the fact that i had to get a MySQL database using ClearDB to host it but it seemed the only way. A few days ago i made some mistakes and kinda broke my current blog (i won’t bother you with the details 😉 ) and had to do some reinstalls. Since quite some time passed i thought it might be good to do some research in the current possibilities of using native azure components for my datastorage.

the first thing i found was using MySQL in app with your Azure web app. This removes the dependency of ClearDB but you’ll still have some limitations such as being limited to a single instance and no features for access your database remotely.

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more info on MySQL in App preview:  https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/appserviceteam/2016/08/18/announcing-mysql-in-app-preview-for-web-apps/

When i looked a bit further i found another cool project called “Project Nami“. Nami stands for Not Another MySQL Install and is a fork of WordPress that changed the database layer to talk T-SQL so they could add SQL Azure as the database layer.

ProjectNamiLogo

Installing it was pretty easy. you can just get it from the Azure Marketplace when you search for “WordPress” or “project Nami” and after that it was installed in a few minutes.

Screen Shot 2016-09-01 at 08.33.16

I have to say the performance is great! the initial costs seem to be lower than they were before and my blog seems to be a lot more responsive. I really liked the upgrade to Project Nami so thought I share it with you so you might consider making the same switch if you are still running wordpress + mysql on Azure.

One downside of my screwing up my previous blog instance is that all comments are kinda lost. so thats why you might not see any comments on my older posts anymore.

Geert van der Cruijsen